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Boulder-White Clouds Council
Post Office Box 6313
Ketchum, Idaho 83340
www.wildwhiteclouds.org

2003 All rights reserved.
 

 

Current News & Issues: Wolves

Back to Wolves     BWCC 2003 Wolf Outing     Back to News & Issues

 

Yearling female B326, the beauty of the pack, crosses Highway 75 in September, hurrying to catch up with her mom. Photo by Lynne Stone, Copyright 2007.
Phantom Hill alpha male B333 feeds on a road-killed cow elk at Phantom Hill north of Ketchum. He was trapped and collared in August and then become more wary of humans. Photo courtesy of Claudia Fiaschetti, Copyright 2007.
Phantom Hill alpha female guided her new pack through a tough 2007 summer among thousands of sheep. Photo by Lynne Stone, Copyright 2007.

PACK UPDATE: June 2008
Only one wolf pup from 2007's litter of three is still alive. One pup disappeared over the winter. Another, a female, was hit be a car in May 2008, as she was crossing Highway 75 north of Ketchum.


INTRODUCING THE "PHANTOMS"
Meet the Neighbors
By Lynne Stone
Copyright 2007. All photos are by Lynne Stone, Boulder-White Clouds Council, unless otherwise noted.

Three black wolves showed up last Spring north of Ketchum near Phantom Hill on Highway 75. They were seen feeding on three different road-killed cow elk. The new pack was named Phantom Hill and had three black pups. The alpha female has an injury that causes her to move with a noticeable limp.

The black wolves attracted attention of motorists and bicyclists plus local Forest Service officials. Two sheep bands would soon arrive for summer grazing. Discussions were held with wolf managers and the two sheep allotment permittees. One rancher agreed to use other grazing areas in order to give the wolves a chance to raise their pups and be able to move on. The second rancher did not. Wolves, whether it was Phantom Hill or others, killed some lambs. Things were looking grim for the "Phantoms" until calls from citizens and media publicity spared them being lethally controlled.

Efforts were made to provide the two herders on the Baker Creek Allotment with information and non-lethal methods to deter the wolves. Wolf managers trapped and collared the alpha male and a yearling female so the pack could be tracked. All six of the Phantom Hill wolves made it through the grazing and trailing season, which finally ended on October 20th.

 

PHOTOS, TOP TO BOTTOM

Yearling female B326, the beauty of the pack, crosses Highway 75 in September, hurrying to catch up with her mom.

Phantom Hill alpha male B333 feeds on a road-killed cow elk at Phantom Hill north of Ketchum. He was trapped and collared in August and then become more wary of humans. Claudia Fiaschetti Photo, Copyright 2007.

Phantom Hill alpha female guided her new pack through a tough 2007 summer among thousands of sheep.

Now, if the black Phantoms stay in the upper Wood River Valley this winter, they likely will become one of the most famous and most viewed wolf packs in the world. Perhaps this will save them in the end. Over the winter we hope ways can be agreed upon to keep the sheep safe and the wolves alive next summer.
 

PHANTOM HILL WOLF FIELD TRIPS
Boulder-White Clouds Council led outings in
the Phantom's home territory in the Spring and
Summer of 2008. Read more and look at photos.

E-mail us if you're a wolf supporter and you'd like to
be informed of upcoming Phantom field trips.

We cannot charge for our outings, but we
appreciate donations to help the wolves.

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